Street art

Street art is any art developed in public spaces — that is, "in the streets" — though the term usually refers to art of an illicit nature, as opposed to government sponsored initiatives. The term can include traditional graffiti artwork, stencil graffiti, sticker art, and street poster art video projection, art intervention, guerrilla art, flash mobbing and street installations. Typically, the term Street Art or the more specific Post Graffiti is used to distinguish contemporary public-space artwork from territorial graffiti, vandalisme, and corporate art.


The motivations and objectives that drive street artists are as varied as the artists themselves. There is a strong current of activism and subversion > in urban art. Street art can be a powerful platform for reaching the public, and frequent themes include adbusting, subvertising and other culture jamming, the abolishment of private property and reclaiming the streets. Other street artists simply see urban space as an untapped format for personal artwork, while others may appreciate the challenges and risks that are associated with installing illicit artwork in public places. However the universal theme in most, if not all street art, is that adapting visual artwork into a format which utilizes public space, allows artists who may otherwise feel disenfranchised, to reach a much broader audience than traditional artwork and galleries normally allow.



Techniques,whereas traditional > artists have primarily used free-hand aerosol paints to produce their works, "street art" encompasses many other media and techniques such as >wheatpasting, stickers, stencil graffiti, mosaic tiling, video projection and .

Traditional graffiti also has increasingly been adopted as a method for advertising; its trajectory has even in some cases led to its artists' working on contract as graphic artists for corporations. Street art is a label often adopted by artists who wish to keep their work unaffiliated, and strongly political. Street artists are those whose work is still largely done without official approval in public areas.

For these reasons street art is sometimes considered "post-graffiti" and sometimes even "neo-graffiti". Street art can be found around the world and street artists often travel to other countries foreign to them so they can spread their designs.